Top 10 Vegetables My Dog Can Eat

Food & Nutrition | Dog

Top 10 Vegetables My Dog Can Eat

As a kid, I used to feed my dog the vegetables I didn’t want under the dinner table all of the time. And I almost got away with it every single time! But now thinking back, I didn’t stop to consider if what I was sharing with my dog was safe for him to eat.

Nowadays I recognize the importance of knowing which human foods are safe for dogs and although I don’t pawn my vegetables off on my furry friends anymore, I still share with them! Vegetables as a treat or additional supplement to your dog’s daily diet can provide him with many of the essential vitamins and nutrients that he might not be getting enough of otherwise.

You may find that some of these yummy veggies are already included in your pet's diet, but real, whole food treats deliver more nutrition and flavour than the processed ingredients found in prepared diets, like kibble and canned foods. However, they should not exceed 10% of your dog's current diet.

We’ve put together this list of the top 10 vegetables to feed your dog.

1. Asparagus

asparagus

Can dogs eat asparagus? Yes!

Asparagus might not be everyone's favourite veggie, but there’s no denying that it’s good for us. They’re also good for your dog as well!

Benefits of Asparagus

Asparagus is loaded with many nutrients that can support your dog's overall health!

  • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Thiamine - supports high energy organ function, like the brain and kidneys
  • Vitamin A - maintain healthy eyes, skin, coat, muscles and nerve function
  • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormones secretion, growth, and weight management
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
  • Fiber - supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal

How to Feed Your Dog Asparagus

So, asparagus is both safe and good for dogs, but it’s probably not the first vegetable you’d think to feed your dog, right?

If you're anything like me, then you probably prefer asparagus when it’s grilled up with a load of butter and garlic. Of course, your dog can’t eat it that way, so we’ve put together some do’s and don’ts to help you feed asparagus to your dog safely.

Do cook the asparagus. Raw asparagus stalks are tough and woody, and they are quite difficult to digest. That's why we trim off the tough ends when we cook asparagus. Gently steaming the stalks can soften the tough stalks and make them much easier for your dog to digest. Make sure that asparagus made for your pet is not cooked in butter, oil, or spices.

We know that cooking a vegetable can destroy some of the nutrition, but is there a way to feed raw asparagus to your dog without causing digestive issues?

There is! Instead of steaming it, purée the raw asparagus. All vegetables have an indigestible outer layer called cellulose. Puréeing it will break apart the casing, and in the case of asparagus, will break apart the tough structure of the stalk to make it a breeze for your dog to digest properly.

Don’t feed whole stalks. It’s best to trim off the toughest end of the asparagus just like you would when preparing it for yourself. Even when cooked, a whole asparagus stalk can be a choking hazard.

Whether you are feeding asparagus as a treat or adding it to their meals, we recommend cutting the asparagus into bite sized pieces first.

Do feed in moderation. Feeding veggies as treats or as part of their meals is fine, but portion control is important. Treats and meal toppers should be less than 10% of their daily diet. This will ensure that they are always getting an appropriate amount and variety of nutrients to support them.

Over-feeding treats, table scraps, and even healthy veggies can lead to digestive discomfort. Remember that asparagus is high in fiber.

Fiber is helpful for digestion, but too much or too little can cause issues. If your dog is getting gassy after eating asparagus, then it’s probably time to cut his portion or switch to a less fibrous veggie treat.

Don’t freak out if you notice your dog has some unusually smelly pee. Just like in humans, one of the by-products of digesting asparagus is pungent urine.

Adding asparagus to a meal is a great way to spice up your dog's dinner and add some extra nutrition, too. For alternative treat options, asparagus can be added to bone broth recipes, homemade goodies, and even frozen dog treat recipes.

Don't get asparagus confused with asparagus fern. Though related, asparagus food is an ornamental plant and is not edible. In fact it's highly toxic for dogs. 

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - 3-4 bite-sized pieces (1 stalk)
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 2 stalks, cut into bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Gently steam before feeding to boost digestibility
  • Be sure to cut asparagus into bite-sized pieces as its stringy stalk can be a choking hazard

 

Dangerous Garden Plants for Dogs

2. Bell Peppers

bell-peppers

Can dogs eat bell peppers? Absolutely!

Bell peppers for your puppers! This next vegetable is another crunchy, nutritious and hydrating treat for your dog to enjoy. Fresh bell peppers in all of their varieties are delicious to munch on. Your dog may think so too!

Benefits of Peppers

This colorful veggie is an excellent treat to feed to your four-legged pal as often as a few times per week. Green, red, yellow or orange bell peppers are all water-dense, rich in essential vitamins (especially vitamin C and have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Red peppers have been said to be the most nutritious of the bunch!

  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Vitamin A - maintain healthy eyes, skin, coat, muscles and nerve function 
  • Vitamin B3 - support healthy metabolism, cognitive function, beneficial to hormone secretion, promotes healthy digestion
  • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormones secretion, growth, and weight management
  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system
  • Vitamin E - builds strong muscles and promotes healthy circulation, works as effective antioxidant 
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
  • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Manganese - aids in bone growth, thyroid function, and digestion, slows aging process
  • Phosphorus - supports bone health and kidney function, aids in motor function 
  • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity and prevents future illness
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases

How to Feed Your Dog Peppers

Like with any fruit or vegetable, it’s important to know your dog’s feeding guidelines based on their size and needs. But when it comes to feeding bell peppers, it’s hard to go wrong. The key is to know your dog’s individual eating habits and take note of what things might cause stomach issues or poor digestion. Always start slow at first to see how your dog’s body reacts.

Here are some do’s and don’ts to follow!

Do feed them raw or cooked. Your dog might really enjoy the juicy and crunchy texture of raw bell peppers, but you can also choose to cook or steam them. Just be sure not to use any oils, butters, or seasonings that can be toxic to your pup.

The best way to cook bell peppers is to steam them. This is quick, easy and preserves the most nutritional value.

And also be sure to let them cool before feeding them to your doggo!! Dogs sometimes don’t realize that food is hot, and they certainly don’t know to blow on it before taking a bite. Make sure to wait a few minutes before serving the peppers (or any cooked vegetable) so your dog doesn’t burn her mouth.

Don’t feed seeds, stem or whole peppers. The seeds and stem of a bell pepper aren’t necessarily toxic to your dog, but can be much more difficult to digest properly. It’s best to avoid feeding your dog these parts of the pepper.

It is also highly recommended to avoid feeding your dog a whole pepper without chopping it up into smaller pieces first. Cutting the bell peppers into bite-sized treats make it easy for your dog to chew, swallow and digest. Understand the right sizing and portion amount for your dog’s particular size and dietary needs.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Fairly often (two or three times per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1-2 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 30 lbs dog - 2 -3 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving

Feeding Tips:

  • Serve raw or fully cooked, all colours
  • Avoid feeding the stem, as it is not easily digestible

 

3. Broccoli

broccoli

Can dogs eat broccoli? Yes!

Raw broccoli can be particularly difficult for dogs to digest, but steaming, cooking, or puréeing it can make digesting it a little easier!

Benefits of Broccoli

Broccoli is chock full of useful vitamins and minerals. Its anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties keep your dog active and happy.

  • Vitamin A - maintain eyes, skin, and coat health as well as strong muscles and active nerve function
  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting
  • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Manganese - aids in bone growth, thyroid function, and digestion, slows aging process
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, helps with hormone, muscle and nerve function

How to Feed Your Dog Broccoli

While many dogs might turn their snout at the sight of it, broccoli can provide so many valuable benefits. Just be sure to serve it in the right way and follow the right guidelines for your pet’s size. Here are some do’s and don’ts when it comes to feeding your dog broccoli.

Do cook the broccoli. If you’ve ever tried to bite into a raw floret of broccoli, you know how tough and dense it can be. Despite your dog’s sharp teeth and strong jaw, it can be difficult for her as well! It can also be tough on their digestive system.

It’s best to cook the broccoli in some way to make it easier to chew and digest. Steaming or cooking broccoli on the stove are both quick and easy processes. The broccoli will become softer and more gentle on your dog’s digestive tract. Never cook your dog’s broccoli in oil, butter or spices!

You can also puree or food process the raw broccoli to break it down into more of a paste that you can add to your dog’s bowl of kibble or be fed on its own. This makes it especially easy for your pooch to digest and absorb all of the nutrients broccoli has to offer.  

Don’t feed too often. Broccoli is full of fibre and is a member of the brassica family, so feeding too much of it to your dog can cause GI irritation and bad gas. It also can potentially contain something called isothiocyanate, which is a naturally occurring compound that can result in severe abdominal pain and other digestive issues.

Just a small amount of isothiocyanate won’t do too much harm to your dog’s health. If your dog really enjoys broccoli, don’t let it make up any more than 10% of her daily calorie intake! Too much broccoli (25% or more) can cause the isothiocyanate to turn into a fatal toxin.

Do watch for signs of tummy trouble. Every dog is different and can have a different reaction to broccoli. Just because one dog can enjoy broccoli without experiencing any problems, doesn’t mean another dog will have the same reaction.

That’s why it is important to always keep an eye on your doggo after you feed her broccoli (or any fruit or vegetable) and take note of any digestive problems that arise. Look out for diarrhea, vomiting, gas or other signs of gut irritation.

Don’t feed your dog the whole head or large pieces. It’s important to cut the broccoli up into pieces. Start slow to see how she likes it and how she feels after eating a small amount.

You obviously don’t want to give your dog a full flowering head of broccoli, but you don’t want to give her over-sized pieces either. Depending on your dog’s size, chop it up into smaller, bite-able pieces to avoid choking. See the guidelines below for more tips on how to feed broccoli.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week) 

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  30 lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  70 lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

 

 Feeding Tips:

  • Cook or steam
  • Cut into small florets before feeding
  • Stems are also safe to feed to dogs in small portions

 

4. Carrots

carrots

Can dogs eat carrots? They sure can!

Rabbits aren’t the only animals that enjoy eating carrots! They’re great for dogs too. Raw carrots are crunchy, tough and full of fibre which makes them a great natural toothbrush. Their tough structure scrapes the teeth and helps to remove plaque build up. They also work as a great energy booster!

Benefits of Carrots

Carrots are loaded with essential vitamins and other beneficial elements. They’re also a low-calorie and low-fat snack.

  • Vitamin A - maintain eyes, skin, and coat health as well as strong muscles and active nerve function
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity and prevents future illness
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, helps with hormone, muscle and nerve function  
  • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, has natural calming effect

How to Feed Your Dog Carrots

Carrots are one of the best vegetables to feed to your dog. Your dog’s everyday kibble or canned food might even have carrots in it already. Either way, carrots are a nutrient-dense addition to your dog’s diet, as well as an excellent way to clean his teeth and improve his puppy breath!

But before you start adding them to his bowl of kibble, be sure to know the proper feeding guidelines for his particular size and needs. Here is a list of do’s and don’ts for feeding your dog carrots.

Do feed raw, juiced, cooked, steamed or frozen. Carrots are not only a nutritious and delicious treat for your pup to enjoy, but they are incredibly versatile!

Unlike asparagus and broccoli, carrots can be given to your dog raw. If you’re going to give your dog a whole carrot, be sure that it is a size he can handle and won’t choke on. We also recommend shredding or grating them, especially for smaller doggos. This will help your dog with chewing and digesting this fibrous veggie.

When cooking or steaming your carrots, don’t use butter, oil or spices. Soft carrots can be mashed or pureed to then be added to your dog’s usual dinner in moderation.

You can also feed your dog carrot juice! Cold carrot juice on a hot summer day acts as a refreshing treat for your dog. If you don’t have a juicer to make your own and want to try feeding your dog carrots this way, be sure to purchase 100% carrot juice!

Lastly, freezing carrots is another excellent option for feeding this veggie to your pooch. Just like raw carrots, frozen carrots are hard and work well to clean the plaque off of your dog’s teeth as they chew on them.

Don’t feed too much or too often. Carrots are high in sugar content, so they shouldn’t make up too much of your dog’s weekly diet. Too much sugar in a dog’s diet can lead to an upset stomach, weight gain, or more serious issues like diabetes. Additionally, carrots are rich in vitamin A. While this is a crucial vitamin for dog’s to get in their diet, an excessive amount can become toxic.

Another essential nutrient that carrots have quite a bit of is fibre. Eating fibre in excess can also cause your dog to have stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation.

Carrots should be fed occasionally, such as one time per week. It’s also important to know your dog’s size and make sure you don’t give him too big of a piece. This can become a choking hazard. If you’ve never given your dog carrots before, be sure to start slow and see how he reacts before overdoing it.

Do thoroughly wash carrots. Be sure to give the carrots a nice scrub to remove all pesticides, chemicals and dirt. It’s also recommended to peel off the skin before feeding them to your dog.

Don’t forget to brush your dog’s teeth! Carrots work as an excellent toothbrush, but you shouldn’t rely solely on carrots to take care of your dog’s teeth and gum health.Pet Dental Care Guide

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  •  10 lbs dog - 2-3 bite-sized pieces (1 Tbsp)
  •  30 lbs dog - 3-4 bite-sized pieces (up to 1/4 cup)
  •  70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed raw or steamed baby carrots
  • Cut larger carrots into bite-sized pieces
  • Cooked carrots are more easily-digestible to dogs  



5. Cauliflower

 

cauliflower

Can dogs eat cauliflower? Yes!

A relative to broccoli, cauliflower is another safe and nutritious vegetable for your dog to enjoy. If you’ve ever wondered if you can share your cauliflower with your dog, the answer is absolutely. Just be sure to feed it in moderation and to follow the right feeding guidelines!

Benefits of Cauliflower

Cauliflower has an abundance of nutrients and health benefits for your four-legged companion. A small serving of cauliflower occasionally can help with your dog’s colon health, vision, blood flow, and stave off weight or bowel issues.

  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system 
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
  • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, helps with hormone, muscle and nerve function  
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Choline - detoxes the liver, improves cognitive behaviors and function

How to Feed Your Dog Cauliflower

Cauliflower is super versatile when it’s on your own dinner plate. I love cooking my cauliflower up with lots of butter and spices, or blending it into mashed side (like a healthy version of mashed potatoes). But when feeding it to your dog, it’s important to avoid oils, butters, salt and spices.

It’s best to keep it simple! Here is a list of do’s and don’ts when feeding your dog cauliflower.

Do cook the cauliflower. By steaming or cooking the cauliflower, it becomes more digestible and easier to chew. Always be sure to let it cool off before serving it to your pup.

You can also blend or puree the cauliflower, just as you would broccoli, to break it down even further into a mash and combine it with their kibble or canned food. This is especially helpful for older dogs that have a more difficult time chewing.

Don’t feed stems, whole flowers or large chunks. Be sure to remove the stems and chop up the cauliflower or puree it to avoid creating a choking hazard for your doggo.

Depending on your dog’s size, you should cut the cauliflower into bite-size pieces. If your dog has never tried cauliflower before, take it slow. Feed him just a small amount at first and see how he reacts. The high fibre content in cauliflower can cause digestive problems and constipation, so be sure to keep an eye on him after feeding.

Do feed in moderation. Although cauliflower is rich in nutrients that are beneficial to your dog’s health, too much cauliflower can cause gastrointestinal issues, including nausea, diarrhea, or gas. It’s highly recommended to only feed your dog this vegetable occasionally, meaning one time per week.

Similar to its green cousin broccoli, cauliflower contains isothiocyanate. And as we mentioned above, this naturally occurring compound can be nutritious in small doses. However, large amounts of isothiocyanate can become harmful.

 

Don’t add any flavors, salts, garlic, or other veggies in the allium family. Dogs have different taste buds than us, which means they don’t enjoy or need all of the extra flavoring like we do! Plus, these added spices and flavors can be toxic to dogs.

Additionally, other foods categorized as part of the allium family can be toxic to dogs. When combined with cauliflower, the compounds can cause a fatal reaction.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (one time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Best served steamed or cooked to make it more digestible
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces before serving

 

6. Celery

celery

Can dogs eat celery? Absolutely!

Celery is another safe vegetable for dogs that has a nice crunch and helps to freshen up your dog’s breath. Although it might seem plain and boring, many dogs really enjoy munching on a refreshing stalk of celery!

Benefits of Celery

Celery is moisture-rich, which makes it a great way to increase your dog’s water intake. It is also loaded with essential nutrients that can help keep his immune system active and improve his cardiovascular health.

  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, helps with hormone, muscle and nerve function  
  • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow
  • Phosphorus - supports bone health and kidney function, aids in motor function 
  • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity and prevents future illness
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases

How to Feed Your Dog Celery

There are so many great reasons to feed your doggo celery. It’s crunchy, hydrating and nutrient-dense. Celery has excellent anti-inflammatory and antioxidants to keep your dog’s body in tip top shape.

It’s important to make sure you take care when feeding your dog celery based on her size and needs! Check out these celery do’s and don’ts.

Do cut into small pieces. The tough, stringy texture of celery can be hard for dogs to digest and can quickly turn into a choking hazard if the pieces are too large. For this reason, it’s best to chop it up into bite-sized pieces before feeding it to your dog.

Dogs have a tendency to swallow raw vegetables without chewing them enough. Smaller pieces are easier to chew and better for them to digest. Be sure to check your doggo’s teeth after serving her celery as it can often get stuck between the molars. You can also juice celery and offer it this way to your pup in moderation.

Celery can also be pureed, steamed or cooked to make it more digestible.

Don’t feed too often or too much. While celery is practically calorie-less and can be eaten abundantly by humans, it should only be given occasionally to dogs.

Celery is rich in vitamin C. Unlike humans, dogs produce vitamin C naturally in their systems so they don’t need too much of it in their diet. However, small amounts of vitamin C and its antioxidant properties can help balance the natural levels of vitamin C in their bodies while also supporting a healthy immune system.

Do dip in peanut butter! Dogs love a little peanut butter and as you know, celery dipped in some pet-safe PB makes for a super yummy treat that both you and your dog can enjoy. Be sure to check feeding guidelines for peanut butter so you know the right amount to feed your pooch.

Don’t worry if your dog pees a little more than usual or has loose stools after consuming celery. It is a moisture-dense vegetable and works to hydrate the body. However, this is another reason why it should be fed in moderation.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (one time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 2 - 3 1/2" wide pieces, raw, cooked, or pureed
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Cut into bite-sized pieces and add a little peanut butter to grab dog's attention
  • Serve cooked, steamed, or pureed without seasoning
  • Cut in small pieces as stringy pieces can be a choking hazard

 

7. Cucumber

cucumbers

Can dogs eat cucumber? Yes!

Cucumber is another super hydrating and refreshing snack for both you and your dog to enjoy!

Benefits of Cucumber

This moisture-dense vegetable is low in calories and carbohydrates. It also has anti-inflammatory properties that makes it a great source of nutrients for dogs suffering from arthritis, injuries or other conditions. It also works to clean out the bacteria in your dog’s mouth to freshen up his breath!

  • Vitamin A - maintain eyes, skin, and coat health as well as strong muscles and active nerve function 
  • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormones secretion, growth, and weight management
  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system 
  • Vitamin D - supports bone growth, manages levels of calcium in the body, supports muscle and nerve function
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance

How to Feed Your Dog Cucumber

Cucumbers are super safe and nutritious for your dog to eat! Many dogs don’t like the plain flavor, but others really enjoy the crunchy, juicy texture. Here are a few do’s and don’ts for feeding your dogs cucumbers!

Do slice into bite-sized pieces. Cucumbers can become a choking hazard if not cut into the right sized pieces! Depending on your dog’s size, slice the cucumber before serving. You can also puree it in a food processor and pour over their kibble or mix in with their canned food.

If your dog doesn’t drink enough water, switching it up with cucumber juice is a great way to make sure they stay hydrated. This also allows your dog to absorb all of the nutrients in the cucumber and digest better. Don’t have a juicer? No problem! Just be sure to buy 100% cucumber juice and avoid anything with added or processed sugars.

Don’t feed every day. Unlike the other vegetables we’ve covered so far, cucumbers can be enjoyed fairly often. In other words, your doggo can eat cucumbers two or three times per week.

 

Cucumber can also cause loose stools and more frequent urination! Keep an eye on your dog after feeding her cucumber to ensure that she isn’t having a bad reaction.

Do dip in peanut butter or applesauce! Why not make this refreshing snack even tastier and more exciting? Dogs love peanut butter and natural applesauce. Maybe this doesn’t sound very appetizing for the human palate, but I’m sure your dog will love it and love you for it!

Don’t feed your dog pickles! You might assume that if cucumbers are safe for your dog to eat, pickles must be too. This is not the case. Pickles contain excessive vinegar, salt and sometimes other harmful spices. These ingredients can cause gut irritation and stomach issues.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Fairly often (two to three times per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces, peeled
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized pieces, peeled
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces, peeled
  • Rarely (once per month)
  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 3 small mushrooms
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup small mushrooms, cooked
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup small mushrooms, cooked

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed raw, unpeeled to make it more easily digestible
  • Pair with carrots for a tasty, nutritious snack
  • Feed cooked or steamed

 

8. Mushrooms

Can dogs eat mushrooms? Yes – with caution!

While store-bought mushrooms are generally safe for your dog to eat, we want to make it incredibly clear how to properly cook them and which kinds!

Benefits of Mushrooms

Mushrooms fed to your dog in moderation can add great nutritional value to their diet! They are low in calorie, plus fat and cholesterol free making them a beneficial snack if fed correctly.

  • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, has natural calming effect 
  • Copper - builds collagen, supports bone health, helps absorb iron, works as an antioxidant, supports healthy skin and coat 
  • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow

How to Feed Your Dog Mushrooms

While mushrooms are a delicious addition to our dinner plates, I don’t know anyone who would eat them without covering them in sauce and seasonings. However, when it comes to feeding mushrooms to dogs, it’s important to serve them plain as these additives can cause an upset stomach or other digestive issues. Here are some more do’s and don’ts.

Do feed your dog specific, store-bought mushrooms! Portobellos, white button, cremini, shiitake, porcini, reishi, and maitake mushrooms are safe for your dog to consume.

Don’t let your dog eat wild mushrooms! They can be poisonous. If your dog consumes wild mushrooms, it can be fatal. Do not allow your dog to eat any mushrooms that might be growing in your backyard or found on your usual walks.

In the event that your dog consumes a wild mushroom, do not hesitate. Contact your vet and poison control center immediately. Signs of mushroom poisoning include vomiting, salivation, urination, and extreme tear production. More serious symptoms include tremors, seizures, and sedation.

Do cook the mushrooms. I don’t know anyone that enjoys the taste of raw mushrooms. I think it’s safe to say that your dog won’t enjoy it either! Be sure to wash the mushrooms thoroughly and remove the part under the head. Cut into small pieces based on your dog’s size and feeding guidelines.

Cook or steam the mushrooms before giving them to your pooch. Don’t add any salt, spices, oil or butter as these ingredients can be harmful to your dog’s health.

Don’t feed too much or too often. If you’re introducing mushrooms to your pet for the first time, start slow and offer just a small amount at first to see how he reacts. The high fiber content and other nutrients can cause digestion trouble for certain dogs, so be sure to keep a close eye on your dog after you feed him any mushrooms.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Rarely (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 3 small mushrooms
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup small mushrooms, cooked
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup small mushrooms, cooked

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed cooked or steamed

 

9. Potatoes

potatoes

Can dogs eat potatoes? Definitely!

Potatoes are another vegetable that make for a safe and tasty treat to feed to your dog on occasion.

Benefits of Potatoes

Potatoes are loaded with nutrients and vitamins, but should only be fed to your dog every once in a while as long as they are prepared in the right way.

  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Vitamin B3 - support healthy metabolism, cognitive function, beneficial to hormone secretion, promotes healthy digestion
  • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormones secretion, growth, and weight management
  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system
  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
  • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, has natural calming effect 
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow 
  • Copper - builds collagen, supports bone health, helps absorb iron, works as an antioxidant, supports healthy skin and coat

How to Feed Your Dog Potatoes

The point where people go wrong with feeding their dogs potatoes is the way that they prepare them. The way that we typically like to enjoy potatoes can be harmful to dogs. Follow these do’s and don’ts when feeding potatoes to your pooch!

Do bake or boil the potatoes. This is super important! Raw white potatoes can contain a toxic chemical called solanine, which can cause a dangerous reaction in your dog’s system.

Do not add any oil, butter, salt, or other seasonings to the potato. It might seem strange to bake a potato without these ingredients, but they can be toxic to our furry friends and cause issues with digestion and gut irritation.

Make sure to slice them into bite-sized pieces based on your doggo’s size. We also recommend mashing them up to add into your dog’s usual kibble or wet food.

Don’t feed too often or too much. Potatoes can only be enjoyed by our pets in moderation. Because they have a high sugar content, they should only be given to dogs on rare occasions as too much sugar can cause stomach problems. Avoid feeding potatoes to diabetic dogs entirely.

Do keep the skins! These are chock full of nutrients including molybdenum, which aids in digesting carbohydrates and protecting your dog’s body from excess copper; selenium, which promotes a healthy immune system; and chromium, which can support a healthy metabolism.

Don’t feed your dog french fries, fried wedges, or potato chips. These types of snacks are typically made with heavy oils, salts, and fats that can be a danger to your dog’s health. It is also important to avoid feeding your dog any of the green parts that might be found on a potato as they can be toxic (to you too!). These parts include the unripe areas, leaves, or stems.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Rarely (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized cooked pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-sized cooked pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized cooked pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Serve baked or boiled, cut into bite-sized pieces or mashed
  • Do not add any salt, butter, or other toppings when feeding to your dog
  • To be safe, thoroughly wash potatoes before cooking and serving to your dog
  • Do not feed your dog any potatoes that have any green on them

 

Homemade Dog Treats

10. Tomatoes

tomatoes

Can dogs eat tomatoes? Yes!

Ok, ok, we know that tomatoes are technically a fruit, but it’s treated more like a vegetable and it’s very nutritious, so it made our list! When prepared properly, tomatoes are a wonderful treat to share with your dog. They’re a great source of many important antioxidants, nutrients and other beneficial elements.

Benefits of Tomatoes

Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C and other essential antioxidants that fight free radicals in the body that can cause cancer and other ailments.

  • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
  • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune system
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
  • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal

How to Feed Your Dog Tomatoes

Tomatoes may not seem like the kind of thing you might feed to your dog, but if you choose to give it a try, it’s important to know the right way to do so. Here are the do’s and don’ts for feeding your dog tomatoes.

Do remove the stem and leaves. When it comes to feeding your pup tomatoes, remember that anything green is off limits. Don’t let your dog consume the stem or leaves as they can be harmful to your dog’s health.

Don’t feed unless completely ripe. This is incredibly important because an unripened tomato can be toxic to dogs. For dog owner’s with a garden, keep a close eye on your dog around the tomato plants.

Do cut the tomato into small pieces. Whether you cook the tomato or serve it raw, be sure to chop the tomato up into smaller bits to make it easier for your dog to chew, swallow and digest.

Don’t feed tomato sauce. Pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato soup and other tomato-based foods are not safe to give to your dog. These items are loaded with processed sugars, oils, and other ingredients that are dangerous for your dog to eat.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Rarely to never (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 1 - 2 Tbsp. diced tomatoes or 2 - 3 1/2" square pieces of raw or cooked tomato, fully ripened

Feeding Tips:

  • Pick out only completely ripe tomatoes for your dog
  • Remove the peel and all stems or leaves before feeding
  • Peel and/or fully cook and serve in bite-sized pieces

In Conclusion

While most dogs’ regular diets should consist mostly of meat, vegetables are a beneficial addition to help them get all of the essential nutrients and vitamins they need. As long as you know which ones are safe and the proper guidelines for your dog’s specific dietary needs, you can enjoy a healthy veggie snack with your furry best friend.

Many of these highly nutritious, pet-safe vegetables are used in high-quality, natural dog food. Dog foods that source nutrients from fresh veggies are going to be easier to digest that foods that rely solely on synthetic vitamin and mineral additives. Look for food that offer a healthy mix of high-quality animal proteins, healthy fats and oil, and fresh whole vegetables and fruit. 

Natural Dog Food


Posted by Homes Alive Pets


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