Top 10 Safe Vegetables for Dogs

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37 Minute Read
Updated February 17, 2022

When you were a kid, did you even sneakily feed your vegetables to the dog under the dinner table? "People food" often gets a bad reputation when it comes to how we treat our pets, but some veggies are both safe and nutritious for them. Find out what vegetables are good for dogs and the best ways to offer them.

You love to spoil your pooch, and sometimes, when they rest their chin on your leg and stare longingly up at your dinner, it's hard to not share. Those big sad puppy eyes are just begging for a taste. Even though not everything we eat is safe for dogs, there are many vegetables that you can feel good about sharing.

You may find that some of these yummy veggies are already included in your pet's diet, but real, fresh vegetables can be both a delicious snack and a little nutrient boost. 

 

Should Vegetables for Dogs Be Cooked?

This is a hotly debated question, but there are a few simple best practices that you can use to help you feed veggies safely. Generally, it is recommended that vegetables are cooked to make them easy to digest for dogs. This is because all vegetables contain cellulose. 

Cellulose is a component of plant cell walls and is considered undigestible, which means that the nutrients in the vegetables will not be properly digested when fed raw and whole. The best way to break down the cellulose is by cooking. Steaming the vegetables is the most common way to limit nutrient loss and retain flavour.

While this method is satisfactory, raw feeders and those looking to maximize nutrition may prefer an alternative solution. Pureeing the vegetables will also break down the cellulose, but won't damage or reduce the availability of any of the nutrients. 

Lastly, if you aren't concerned about the nutrient boost and just want a fun and crunchy snack to offer your pooch, then feed the veggies as is. So long as you stick to pet-safe vegetables and remove seeds, stalks, and leaves, raw vegetables are a great option for dogs that love to chew.

 

10 Best Vegetables for Dogs

If you aren't sure which veggies are safe and which veggies to avoid, then this list of the best vegetables for dogs is a great place to start.

1. Can Dogs Eat Asparagus?

VEGETABLES FOR DOGS

Is asparagus safe for dogs? Yes!

Asparagus might not be everyone's favourite veggie, but there’s no denying that it’s good for us. They’re also good for your dog as well!

Health Benefits of Asparagus

Asparagus is loaded with many nutrients that can support your dog's overall health!

    • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Thiamine - supports high-energy organ functions, like the brain and kidneys
    • Vitamin A - maintains healthy eyes, skin, coat, muscles, and nerve function
    • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormone secretion, growth, and weight management
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
    • Fibre - supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal

How to Feed Your Dog Asparagus

Asparagus is both safe and good for dogs, but it’s probably not the first leafy vegetable you’d think to feed your dog, right?

If you're anything like me, then you probably prefer asparagus when it’s grilled up with a load of butter and garlic, but a good rule for pets is to keep it plain and simple. We’ve put together some do’s and don’ts to help you feed asparagus to your dog safely.

Do cook the asparagus. Raw asparagus spears can be tough and woody, which may be a great source of fibre but they are quite difficult to digest. Snap off the tough ends and gently steam the stalks to soften the asparagus and make them much easier for your dog to digest.

Do feed in moderation. Asparagus is very high in fibre, and too much asparagus can cause some digestive discomfort. If your dog is getting gassy after eating asparagus, then it’s probably time to cut his portion or switch to a less fibrous veggie snack.

Don’t feed whole stalks. It’s best to trim off the toughest end of the asparagus just like you would when preparing it for yourself. Even when cooked, a whole asparagus stalk is woody and can be a choking or digestive hazard.

Don’t freak out if you notice your dog has some unusually smelly pee. Just like in humans, one of the by-products of digesting asparagus is pungent urine.

Don't get asparagus confused with asparagus fern. Though related, asparagus fern is an ornamental plant and is not edible. In fact, it's highly toxic to dogs.

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Asparagus Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-size pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - 3-4 bite-size pieces (1 stalk)
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 2 stalks, cut into bite-size pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Gently steam before feeding to boost digestibility
  • Be sure to cut asparagus into bite-size pieces as its stringy stalk can be a choking hazard

 

2. Can Dogs Eat Bell Peppers?

can dogs have vegetables

Can dogs eat bell peppers? Absolutely!

Bell peppers for your puppers! This next vegetable is another crunchy, nutritious, and hydrating treat for your dog to enjoy. Fresh bell peppers in all of their varieties are delicious to munch on. Your dog may think so too!

Benefits of Bell Peppers

This colourful veggie is an excellent treat to feed to your four-legged pal as often as a few times per week. Green, red, yellow, or orange bell peppers are all water-dense, rich in essential vitamins b6 (especially vitamin C and have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties.

Red peppers have been said to be the most nutritious of the bunch!

    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
    • Vitamin A - maintains healthy eyes, skin, coat, muscles, and nerve function 
    • Vitamin B3 - supports a healthy metabolism, and cognitive function is beneficial to hormone secretion, and promotes healthy digestion
    • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormone secretion, growth, and weight management
    • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune system
    • Vitamin E - builds strong muscles and promotes healthy circulation, works as an effective antioxidant 
    • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
    • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
    • Manganese - aids in bone growth, thyroid function, and digestion, slows the aging process
    • Phosphorus - supports bone health issues and kidney function and aids in motor function 
    • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity, and prevents future illness
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cell damage that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases

How to Feed Your Dog Peppers

When it comes to feeding bell peppers, it’s hard to go wrong. The key is to know your dog’s individual eating habits and take note of what things might cause upset stomach and kidney problems, or issues or poor digestion. Always start slow at first to see how your dog reacts to new foods.

Here are some do’s and don’ts to follow:

Do feed them eaten raw or cooked. Your dog might really enjoy the juicy and crunchy texture of raw bell peppers, but you can also choose to cook or steam them. Just be sure not to use any oils, butter, or seasonings that can be toxic to dogs as long as to your pup.

Don’t feed the seeds or stems of the pepper and don't feed the peppers whole. The seeds and stem of bell peppers aren’t necessarily toxic to dogs but can be much more difficult to digest properly. It is also highly recommended to avoid feeding your dog a pepper whole. Instead, chop it up to make it safer for your dog to chew, swallow, and digest.

Bell Pepper Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Fairly often (two or three times per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1-2 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 30 lbs dog - 2 -3 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving

Feeding Tips:

  • Serve eaten raw or fully cooked, all colours
  • Avoid feeding the stem, as it is not easily digestible

 

3. Can Dogs Eat Broccoli?

vegetables safe for dogs

Can dogs have broccoli? Can dogs eat broccoli? Yes!

Raw broccoli can be a particularly difficult treat for dogs to digest, but steaming, cooking, or puréeing it can make digesting it a little easier!

Benefits of Broccoli

Is broccoli good for dogs? Broccoli is chock full of useful and rich in vitamin b6 and minerals. Its anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties keep your dog active and happy.

  • Vitamin A - maintains eyes, skin, and coat health issues as well as strong muscles and active nerve function
  • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune system
  • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting
  • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
  • Manganese - aids in bone growth, thyroid function, and digestion, slows the aging process
  • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
  • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, and helps with hormone, muscle, and nerve function

How to Feed Your Dog Broccoli

While many dogs might turn their snout at the sight of it, broccoli can provide so many valuable health benefits. Just be sure to serve it in the right way and follow the right guidelines for your pet’s size. Here are some do’s and don’ts when it comes to feeding your dog broccoli. Can dogs eat broccoli?

Do cook the broccoli. The stalk of the broccoli is particularly tough, and though your dog can chew it, some dogs won't and risk swallowing large chunks. The florets are softer, but for maximum nutritional benefits, it's best to either cook or puree the broccoli.

Do watch for signs of tummy trouble. Every dog is different and can have a different reaction to broccoli. Just because one dog can enjoy broccoli without experiencing any problems, doesn’t mean another dog will have the same reaction.

Don’t feed too often. Broccoli is full of fibre and is a member of the brassica family, so feeding too much of it to your dog can cause irritation and bad gas. 

Don’t feed your dog with the whole head or large pieces. It’s important to cut the broccoli up into pieces, even when it's cooked. Soft florets get very soft when steamed and easy to chew, but the stocks can still be quite firm. Bite-size pieces are recommended.

Broccoli Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week) 

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  30 lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  70 lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

 Feeding Tips:

  • Cook or steam
  • Cut into small florets before feeding
  • Stems are also safe to feed to dogs in small portions

 

4. Can Dogs Eat Carrots?

what vegetables can dogs eat

Can dogs eat carrots? They sure can!

Rabbits aren’t the only animals that enjoy eating carrots! They’re great for dogs too. Raw carrots are crunchy, tough, and full of fibre which makes them a great natural toothbrush. Their tough structure scrapes the teeth and helps to remove plaque build-up. They also work as a great energy booster!

Benefits of Carrots

Carrots are loaded with essential vitamins and minerals with other beneficial elements. They’re also a low-calorie and low-fat perfect snack.

    • Vitamin A - maintains eyes, skin, and coat health as well as strong muscles and active nerve function
    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
    • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity, and prevents future illness
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, and helps with hormone, muscle, and nerve function  
    • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, and has a natural calming effect

How to Feed Your Dog Carrots

Carrots are one of the best vegetables safe to feed to your dog. Your dog’s everyday kibble or canned food might even have carrots in it already. Either way, carrots are a nutrient-dense addition to your dog’s diet, as well as a great source to clean his teeth and improve his puppy breath!

But before you start adding them to his bowl of kibble, be sure to know the proper feeding guidelines for his particular size and needs. Here is a list of dos and don’ts for feeding your dog carrots and pears yes.

Do feed raw, juiced, cooked, steamed, or frozen. Carrots are not only a nutritious and delicious treat for your pup to enjoy, but they are incredibly versatile! For smaller doggos, try shredding or grating them to use as small training treats or meal toppers.

Do thoroughly wash carrots. Be sure to give the carrots a nice scrub to remove all pesticides, chemicals, and dirt. It’s also recommended to peel off the skin before feeding them to your dog.

Don’t feed too much or too often. Carrots have a high sugar content, so they shouldn’t make up too much of your dog’s weekly diet. Too much sugar in a dog’s diet can feed bad gut bacteria and lead to some gastrointestinal discomfort. Additionally, carrots are rich in vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that is good for eye health and immune system, but an excessive amount can become toxic to dogs.

Don’t forget to brush your dog’s teeth! Carrots are tough and crunchy, giving them a toothbrush-like effect. Though feeding carrots in large quantities is not recommended too often, the occasional veggie chew is a fun way to boost your dog's oral health.

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Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (1 time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  •  10 lbs dog - 2-3 bite-sized pieces (1 Tbsp)
  •  30 lbs dog - 3-4 bite-sized pieces (up to 1/4 cup)
  •  70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed raw or steamed baby carrots
  • Sure to cut larger carrots into bite-sized pieces
  • Cooked carrots are more easily digestible to dogs  

 

5. Can Dogs Eat Cauliflower?

vegetables good for dogs

Can my dog eat cauliflower? Yes!

A relative to broccoli, cauliflower for dogs is another safe and nutritious vegetable for your dog to enjoy. If you’ve ever wondered if you can share your cauliflower with your dog, the answer is absolute. Just be sure to feed it in moderation and follow the right feeding guidelines!

Benefits of Cauliflower

Cauliflower has an abundance of nutrients and health benefits for your four-legged companion. A small serving of cauliflower occasionally can help with your dog’s colon health, vision, and blood flow, and stave off weight or bowel issues.

    • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune system 
    • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
    • Folic acid - aids in amino acid metabolism
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, and helps with hormone, muscle, and nerve function  
    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
    • Choline - detoxes the liver, improves cognitive behaviours and function

How to Feed Your Dog Cauliflower

Cauliflower is super versatile when it’s on your own dinner plate. I love cooking my cauliflower up with lots of butter and spices, or blending it into a mashed side (like carrots healthy version of mashed potatoes). But when feeding it to your dog, it’s important to avoid oils, butter, salt, and spices.

It’s best to keep it simple! Here is a list of do’s and don’ts when feeding your dog cauliflower.

Do cook the cauliflower. Cauliflower is a very dense vegetable and can be difficult to digest when fed raw and whole. Steaming is recommended to soften this veggie so it can be chewed and digested safely. 

Do feed in moderation. Although cauliflower is rich in nutrients that are beneficial to your dog’s health, too much cauliflower can cause gas or gastrointestinal issues, including nausea, diarrhea, or gas. It’s highly recommended to only meal your dog this vegetable occasionally, meaning one time per week.

Don’t feed stems, whole flowers, or large chunks. Be sure to remove the stems and chop up the cauliflower or puree it to avoid creating a choking hazard for your doggo.

Don’t add any flavours, salts, or spices. We not plain cauliflower isn't exactly the most tantalizing treat, but most dogs aren't picky. They are just happy to be included. No seasonings required for Fido.

Cauliflower Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (one time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Best served steamed or cooked to make it more digestible
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces before serving

 

6. Can Dogs Eat Celery?

celery

Is celery safe for dogs? Absolutely!

Celery is another safe vegetable for dogs that has a nice crunch and helps to freshen up your dog’s breath. Although it might seem plain and boring, many dogs really enjoy munching on a refreshing stalk of celery!

Benefits of Celery

Celery is moisture-rich, which makes it a great way to increase your dog’s water intake. It is also loaded with essential nutrients that can help keep his immune system active and improve his cardiovascular health.

    • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune system
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Calcium - supports teeth and bone health, helps with hormone, muscle, and nerve function  
    • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow
    • Phosphorus - supports bone health and kidney function, aids in motor function 
    • Beta-carotene - regulates cellular and immune responses, boosts immunity, and prevents future illness
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases

How to Feed Celery to Dogs

There are so many great reasons to feed your doggo celery. It’s crunchy, hydrating, and nutrient-dense. Celery to your dog has excellent anti-inflammatory and antioxidants to keep your dog’s body in tip-top shape.

It’s important to make sure you take care when feeding your dog celery based on her size and needs! Check out the celery do’s and don’ts.

Do cut it into small pieces. The tough, stringy texture of celery can be hard for dogs to digest and can quickly turn into a choking hazard if the pieces are too large. For this reason, it’s best to chop it up into bite-size pieces before feeding it to your dog.

Do dip in peanut butter! Dogs love a little peanut butter and as you know, celery dipped in some pet-safe PB makes for a super yummy treat that both you and your dog can enjoy. Be conservative with your PB smears though. 

Don’t feed too often or too much. Though celery contains some beneficial nutrients, it doesn't offer any calories or energy. It can be a fun treat, but if you are looking for a nutrition boost, there are more effective options on this list.

Celery Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Occasionally (one time per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 2 - 3 1/2" wide pieces, raw, cooked, or pureed
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-size pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-size pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Cut into bite-size pieces and add a little peanut butter to grab the dog's attention
  • Serve cooked, steamed, or pureed without seasoning
  • Cut in small pieces as stringy pieces can be a choking hazard

 

7. Can Dogs Eat Cucumber?

vegetables safe for dogs

Can dogs eat cucumbers? Yes!

Cucumber is another super hydrating and refreshing snack for both you and your dog to enjoy!

Benefits of Cucumber

This moisture-dense vegetable is low in calories and low in fat and carbohydrates. It also has anti-inflammatory properties that make it a great source of nutrients for dogs suffering from arthritis, injuries, or other conditions. It also works to clean out the bacteria in your dog’s mouth to freshen up his breath!

    • Vitamin A - maintains eyes, skin, and coat health as well as strong muscles and active nerve function 
    • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormone secretion, growth, and weight management
    • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune system 
    • Vitamin D - supports bone growth, manages levels of calcium in the body, supports muscle and nerve function
    • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance

How to Feed Your Dog Cucumber

Cucumbers are super safe and nutritious for your dog to eat! Many dogs don’t like the plain flavour, but others really enjoy the crunchy, juicy texture. Can dogs have cucumbers? Here are a few dos and don’ts for feeding your dog cucumbers!

Do slice into bite-size pieces. Cucumbers can become a choking hazard if not cut into the right-sized pieces! Depending on your dog’s size, slice the cucumber before serving. You can also puree it in a food processor and pour it over their kibble or mix it in with their canned food.

Do offer fresh squeezed cucumber juice If your dog doesn’t drink enough water. This tasty alternative is an easy way to encourage your dog to stay hydrated.

Don’t feed every day. Unlike the other vegetables we’ve covered so far, cucumbers can be enjoyed often but not daily could be too much. This super high moisture veggie can lead to looser stool and more frequent urination is fed too much too often.

Don’t feed your dog pickles! You might assume that if cucumbers are safe for dogs to eat, pickles must be too. This is not the case. Pickles contain excessive vinegar, salt, and sometimes other harmful spices. These ingredients can cause gastric irritation and stomach issues.

Cucumber Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Fairly often (two to three times per week)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-size pieces, peeled
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-size pieces, peeled
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-size pieces, peeled
  • Rarely (once per month)
  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 3 small mushrooms
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup small mushrooms, cooked
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup small mushrooms, cooked

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed raw, unpeeled to make it more easily digestible
  • Pair with carrots for a tasty, nutritious snack
  • Feed cooked or steamed

 

8. Can Dogs Eat Mushrooms?

Can dogs eat mushrooms? Yes – with caution!

While store-bought button mushrooms are generally safe for dogs to eat, we want to make it incredibly clear how to properly cook them and which kinds!

Benefits of Mushrooms

Mushrooms fed to your dog in moderation can add great nutritional value to their diet! They are low in calories and low in fat, plus fat and cholesterol-free making them a beneficial perfect snack for dogs if fed correctly.

    • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
    • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, and has a natural calming effect 
    • Copper - builds collagen, supports bone health, helps absorb iron, works as an antioxidant, supports healthy skin 
    • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, and helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow

How to Feed Your Dog Mushrooms

While mushrooms are a delicious addition to our dinner plates, I don’t know anyone who would eat them without covering them in sauce and seasonings. However, when it comes to feeding mushrooms to dogs, it’s important to serve them plain as these additives can cause an upset stomach or other digestive issues. Here are some more do’s and don’ts.

Do feed your dog specific, store-bought mushrooms! Portobellos, white button, cremini, shiitake, porcini, reishi, and maitake mushrooms are safe for dogs to consume.

Do wash the mushrooms. You know how mushrooms are grown, so this one seems pretty self-explanatory. 

Don’t let your dog eat wild mushrooms! They can be poisonous. If your dog consumes wild mushrooms, it can be fatal. Do not allow your dog to eat any mushrooms that might be growing in your backyard or found on your usual walks.

Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Frequency: Rarely (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - 1 - 3 small mushrooms
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup small mushrooms, cooked
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup small mushrooms, cooked

Feeding Tips:

  • Feed cooked or steamed

 

9. Can Dogs Eat Potatoes?

what vegetables can dogs eat

Are potatoes safe for dogs to eat? Definitely!

Potatoes dogs are another vegetable that makes a great snack, a safe, and tasty treat to feed to your dog on occasion.

Benefits of Potatoes

Potatoes dogs are loaded with nutrients and rich in vitamins, but should only be fed to your dog every once in a while as long as they are prepared in the right way.

    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating the speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal
    • Vitamin B3 - supports healthy metabolism, and cognitive function, benefits hormone secretion, promotes healthy digestion
    • Vitamin B6 - aids in hormone secretion, growth, and weight loss management
    • Vitamin C - supports healthy immune systems
    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
    • Magnesium - supports digestion, reverses urinary problems or constipation, and has natural calming effect 
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Iron - supports the synthesis of blood, helps build hemoglobin and red blood cells to promote healthy blood flow 
    • Copper - builds collagen, supports bone health, helps absorb iron, works as an antioxidant, supports healthy skin

How to Feed Your Dog Potatoes

The point where people go wrong with feeding their dogs potatoes is the way that they prepare them. The way that we typically like to enjoy raw potatoes can be harmful to dogs. Follow these do’s and don’ts when feeding potatoes to your pooch!

Do bake or boil the raw potatoes. This is super important! Raw white potatoes can contain solanine which is toxic to dogs. It can cause a dangerous reaction in your dog’s system.

Do keep the skins! These are chock full of nutrients including molybdenum, which aids in digesting carbohydrates and protecting your dog’s body from excess copper; selenium, which promotes a healthy immune system with omega 3; and chromium, which can support a healthy metabolism.

Don’t feed too often or too much. Potatoes can only be enjoyed by our pets in moderation. Because they have a significant glycemic effect, they should only be given to dogs as occasional treats. Too much potatoes can lead to poor digestion and affect weight management.

Don’t feed your dog french fries, fried wedges, or sweet potato chips. These types of snacks are typically made with heavy oils, salts, and fats that can be a danger to your dog’s health. It is also important to avoid feeding your dog any of the green parts that might be found on potato chips as they can be toxic to dogs (to you too!). These parts include the unripe areas, leaves, or stems.

Potato Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Rarely (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 10 lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-size cooked pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-size cooked pieces
  • 70 lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-size cooked pieces

Feeding Tips:

  • Serve baked or boiled, cut into bite-size pieces or mashed
  • Do not add any salt, butter, or other toppings when feeding to your dog
  • To be safe, thoroughly wash potatoes before cooking and serving to your dog
  • Do not meal your dog any sweet potatoes that have any green on them

 

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10. Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?

tomatoes

Should dogs eat tomatoes? Yes!

Ok, ok, we know that tomatoes are technically a fruit, but it’s treated more like a vegetable and it’s very nutritious, so it made our list! When prepared properly, tomatoes are a wonderful treat to share with your dog. They’re a great source of many important antioxidants, nutrients, and other beneficial elements.

Benefits of Tomatoes

Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C and other essential antioxidants that fight free radicals in the body that can cause cancer and other ailments.

    • Antioxidants - fight free radical cells that can lead to cancer or other mutations and diseases
    • Vitamin C - supports a healthy immune systems
    • Vitamin K - promotes strong bones and activates proper blood clotting 
    • Folate - aids in amino acid metabolism
    • Potassium - supports bone + muscle development and maintenance
    • Fibre -  supports digestion by regulating speed of digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste disposal

How to Feed Your Dog Tomatoes

Tomatoes may not seem like the kind of thing you might feed to your dog, but if you choose to give it a try, it’s important to know the right way to do so. Here are the do’s and don’ts for feeding your dog tomatoes.

Do remove the stem and leaves. When it comes to feeding your pup tomatoes, remember that anything green is off-limits. Don’t let your dog consume the stem or leaves as they can be harmful to your dog’s health.

Do cut the tomato flesh into small pieces. Whether you cook the tomato or serve it raw, be sure to chop the tomato up into smaller bits to make it easier for your dog to chew, swallow and digest.

Don’t feed unless completely ripe. This is incredibly important because an unripened tomato can be toxic to dogs. For dog owners with gardens, keep a close eye on your dog around the tomato plants.

Don’t feed tomato sauce. Pasta sauce, ketchup, tomato soup and other tomato-based foods are not safe to give to your dog. These items are loaded with processed sugars, oils, and other ingredients that are dangerous for your dog to eat.

Tomato Feeding Guidelines for Dogs

Feeding Frequency: Rarely to never (once per month)

Adequate Portion Size:

  • 1 - 2 Tbsp. diced tomatoes or 2 - 3 1/2" square pieces of raw or cooked tomato, fully ripened

Feeding Tips:

  • Pick out only completely ripe tomatoes for your dog
  • Remove the peel and all stems or leaves before feeding
  • Peel and/or fully cook and serve in bite-size pieces

 

Let Them Eat Veggies!

While most dogs’ regular diets should consist mostly of meat, vegetables are a beneficial addition to help them get all of the essential nutrients and rich in vitamins they need. As long as you know which ones are safe and the proper guidelines for your dog’s specific dietary needs, you can enjoy a healthy veggie snack with your furry best friend.

Many of these highly nutritious, pet-safe vegetables are used in high-quality, natural raw dog food. Dog foods that source nutrients from fresh veggies are going to be easier to digest than foods that rely solely on synthetic vitamin and mineral additives. Look for food that offers a healthy mix of high-quality animal proteins, healthy fats and oil, and fresh whole vegetables and fruit.

 

Frequently Asked Questions  

Can I feed vegetables to my dog? 

Yes, many vegetables are safe and healthy for dogs when offered in moderation. As with any food, never overfeed the item.

What are the benefits of feeding vegetables to dogs?

 Vegetables provide dogs with essential vitamins, minerals, and dietary fibre. They can also be a low-calorie treat option for dogs on a weight management diet.

Which vegetables are safe for dogs to eat? 

Safe vegetables for dogs include carrots, peas, green beans, broccoli, and sweet potatoes. Always ensure they are cooked or pureed to ensure easy digestion.

Are there vegetables that are toxic to dogs? 

Yes, some vegetables like onions, chives, rhubarb, and wild mushrooms are not safe for dogs to eat. 

How should I prepare vegetables for my dog? 

Vegetables should be cooked and chopped into small, manageable pieces to prevent choking or pureed if fed raw. Steaming or boiling without added seasonings is a common preparation method.

Can I replace a portion of my dog's regular food with vegetables? 

While vegetables can be a healthy addition to your dog's diet, they should not replace the primary source of nutrition, which should come from balanced dog food. Use vegetables as treats or supplements rather than a main food source.



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